More on Sharks

Ampullae of Lorenzini

Have you ever wondered how sharks get around in the ocean blue? How a hammerhead shark can find its prey without the depth perception or hearing capabilities that we primates have today? You’ve probably figured out that different senses are required to master a life in the sea. One such sensory advantage in sharks is a set of porous organs known as the Ampullae of Lorenzini. They run all along the ventral side of the shark, specifically near the mouth and nostril area.

A close-up of ampullae of a common thresher shark, or Alopias vulpinus.

A close-up of ampullae of a common thresher shark, or Alopias vulpinus.

These ampullae are small jelly-filled sacks that help the sharks detect electric fields and temperature changes in the water. They can also pick up on the electricity put off by other creatures in the sea.

Think of them as underwater whiskers; they help the sharks sense things that they can’t see with their eyes! But instead of long hairs, the sharks’ pores are filled with jelly that can sense a racing heartbeat and fear of prey or the electromagnetic field of the earth. It’s kind of like being psychic; they can sense things and “feelins.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s